Contributed Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan star in Masters of Sex.

Lizzy Caplan has a tattoo on her wrist, but she’s not about to explain what it symbolizes.

“I never tell,” says Caplan, who co-stars with Michael Sheen in the new Showtime series Masters of Sex, about pioneering researchers Masters and Johnson. “That’s one that I’ll never answer, but you can ask all you want about gross sex stuff.”

Challenge accepted.

So how easy is it to talk about sex?

For me? Pretty easy. It’s all I talk about (laughs). For everybody? I think it depends on who you are and where you live and how old you are, but for most people it’s still not as easy as one would think in 2013.

Why do you think that is?

How many hours do you have? I think we’ve come a very, very, very long way since 1956, when the show starts.

But I also think we have a lot further to go, especially when it comes to women and sexuality.

How much do you talk about sex while filming?

I mean… how much do people talk about sex on any film set? It’s like what anybody talks about, so… yeah. We talked about sex just as much as I did on Party Down.

How nerve-racking are the sex scenes to shoot?

I’ve done a few of them before, and it was very, very scary before doing my first one ever. As soon as that one was done, it was shockingly not scary. Because you grow to realize that nobody there is sitting there critiquing your body.

In fact this is a team of very, very accomplished and experienced men and women who know how to light and film you so you look absolutely great.

What stood out most about taking on the role of Virginia Johnson?

To the naked eye, this woman looks like a well-put-together 1950s secretary, but she’s probably the bravest character I have yet to play. There were a lot of people — family, family friends — who told me that they had gone and seen her speak. They all came away with the same impression, which was that she was very charismatic, very smart and even in her older years extremely f—able.

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