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Video: How light pollution affects how we see stars

It's obvious getting away from the city will help you see stars a little better, but just how does light pollution affect what we see above us?

In a video posted to Vimeo, Sriram Murali catalogs how each level of light pollution changes what we can see in the sky.

Vimeo

In a video posted to Vimeo, Sriram Murali catalogs how each level of light pollution changes what we can see in the sky.

If you tried to catch a glimpse of the Perseid meteor shower last week, you may know that where you decide to watch makes all the difference.

Countless tips online point to light pollution maps as an important source to look to before heading out to do any type of star watching, but how exactly does light affect how we see stars?

Sriram Murali, a photographer whose specialty is images of the sky, documented the difference in how the sky appears depending on the level of light pollution in a video titled "Lost in Light" posted to Vimeo.

Just look at the difference from level eight, the highest in light pollution, all the way to level one.

Level eight of light pollution — most likely what many of us see living in Canada's major cities.

Vimeo

Level eight of light pollution — most likely what many of us see living in Canada's major cities.

Level three already looks amazing, with colours of the sky becoming more prominent.

Vimeo

Level three already looks amazing, with colours of the sky becoming more prominent.

Level one, the least amount of light pollution.

Vimeo

Level one, the least amount of light pollution.

"Most of us live under heavily polluted skies and some have never even seen the Milky Way," Murali writes about the film. "We take the skies for granted and are rather lost in our busy lives without much care for the view of the stars."

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