Getty Images The five year unhitch? An Ottawa U masters student is proposing a new type of five-year term marriage.

If the thought of uttering “’til death do us part” gives you a case of commitment phobia, maybe a short-term marriage would suit you best.

Véronique Laliberté, a masters student in law at the University of Ottawa, wants to tweak marriage laws to include a fixed term, with an option to renew.

It’s kind of like signing a deal with a cell phone provider.

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Véronique Laliberté, a masters student the University of Ottawa, is proposing a new, short-term marriage. Also pictured is her partner, Francys-Roch Bisson.

“That’s really romantic, right?” Laliberté said with a laugh.

But, you could argue, undying love is dying out. According to Statistics Canada, there were about 70,000 divorces every year between 2001 and 2008.

The point of a fixed-term marriage is to avoid the hassle of divorcing through court, explained Laliberté. Say a couple wants to marry, but decides on a pre-nuptial agreement in case the relationship crumbles. Once the arranged fixed term is up, they could end the relationship, renew it for a second term or do nothing, at which point the pre-nup conditions would be void.

It’s like a plan to untangle the knot before it’s tied.

“I would like to make it – not easier, but simpler. Less complicated,” Laliberté said.

She was awarded the 2013-2014 Haykal-Sater prize for the best French-language thesis at her school. And she and her partner tried a three-month relationship contract that has so far ended well. They have been together for a little over a year.

She’s not the first to conceive of a short-term marriage.

In 2011, Mexico City politicians introduced two-year temporary marriage licenses that were mandatory before the real deal. It was up for debate in Germany in 2007, but for a seven-year term. It has yet to be enacted in law.

Judy Kiar, an individual, couple and family therapist in Ottawa, said this type of relationship might work for some couples, but said it undermines the hard work a lifelong marriage requires.

“Oftentimes, people think that things should come easy and so if it’s hard maybe it’s not meant to be,” she said. “But the reality is, there’s something to be said for working at something and seeing it evolve into something better, rather than just having a change-partners mentality.”

Laliberté is considering pursuing her PhD on the topic and bring it into law. She hopes to be the first in Canada to legally say “I do” to a short-term marriage.

Metro asked: What do you think of short-term marriages?

"I think marriage is way too important to put it out as a possibility for a lifetime commitment. I'm a little old-fashioned." - Chris Whitecross, 51

“I think marriage is way too important to put it out as a possibility for a lifetime commitment. I’m a little old-fashioned.”
– Chris Whitecross, 51

“I got married when I was what, 19, 20? Not to this guy, though. He’s my boyfriend. We’ve been together a few years now. I would support the whole five-year thing.” - Kristen Cayen, 30 “The whole marriage thing isn’t my thing.” - Bradley Freda, 32

“I got married when I was what, 19, 20? Not to this guy, though. He’s my boyfriend. We’ve been together a few years now. I would support the whole five-year thing.”
– Kristen Cayen, 30
“The whole marriage thing isn’t my thing.”
– Bradley Freda, 32

“I’ve never even thought of a short-term marriage. Marriage is long-term.” - Marc Vaillant, 60

“I’ve never even thought of a short-term marriage. Marriage is long-term.”
– Marc Vaillant, 60

“It depends who you are, I guess. I feel like if you date someone for five years, that’s essentially what they’re doing. You’re testing it out.”  - Brody Johnston, 17 “It’s good for some people who are afraid of commitment.” - Morgan Vallieres, 16

“It depends who you are, I guess. I feel like if you date someone for five years, that’s essentially what you’re doing. You’re testing it out.”
– Brody Johnston, 17
“It’s good for some people who are afraid of commitment.”
– Morgan Vallieres, 16

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