For Metro/Julian Uzielli London artist Nik Harron displays his work at the Banting and Friends art show Sunday outside the Banting House (442 Adelaide St. N.). The annual event is a fundraiser for the house-turned-museum where Sir Frederick Banting discovered insulin in 1921.

London got a shot of local art this weekend at Banting House’s fourth annual Banting and Friends art show.

The show highlighted works by five London artists to raise money for the Banting House, where insulin founder Sir Frederick Banting operated his medical practice.

“As Canadians, we know Banting for the discovery of insulin. What a lot of us don’t know is that he was actually a pretty good painter,” said Grant Maltman, the museum’s curator.

The art show was created as a way to benefit both local artists and Banting’s memory along with carrying on his artistic legacy. Half the proceeds from sales went to the Banting House museum with a goal of bringing in $10,000.

The show is the only annual fundraiser for the museum, Maltman said. Other money for operations comes from the Canadian Diabetes Association.

Banting did about 200 paintings, and frequently painted landscapes with A.Y. Jackson of the Group of Seven.

“It became his great escape,” Maltman said.

Along with preserving history and helping local talent, the annual show plays another important role.

“We take the discovery of insulin almost for granted now,” artist Diana Tamblyn said. “It saves people’s lives every day, and the history of it started here.”

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