Canadian company Second Denim Co., the brand behind the increasingly popular Yoga Jean styles, is expected to double its production of the anti-sag, designer denim in 2010.

Eric Wazana is very happy. So is the growing number of Canadian women of all ages and sizes who are getting into his pants.  

Wazana is the owner and designer of Second Denim Co. (www.secondclothing.com), the Montreal-based Canadian company behind Yoga Jeans, which have been met with impressive national success since a PR push in February. In August, the company doubled its production facilities and is looking to double in size yet again in the new year to handle the steadily increasing demand.

The fabric is a key to the Yoga Jean success. Its three per cent elastane stretch makes the no-sag denim feel like leggings, but the flattering fits, cuts and range of high-fashion washes are all designer jean.

Michelle Germain, owner of Toronto boutique Shopgirls says that since stocking her shelves just nine months ago, she’s sold about 1,500 pairs (she now also sells them online). “Women love them. The fabric holds everything in and smooths it all out comfortably whether you’re carrying some extra weight or just had a baby,” she explains.

At Germain’s behest, there’s also a high-rise version with a waistband just one inch higher than the original for customers who want to prevent a “muffin-top” bulge.

Second Denim and Shopgirls partnered to launch Feel Good, Real Good, a new online and in-store re-branding campaign featuring average-size women. “We’ve seen over and over the reactions our customers have to the fit and feel of Yoga Jeans,” says Germain. “They appeal to women of all shapes, sizes, and ages from 16 to 75 who want to be comfortable but feel sexy, too.” (Advice: turn the monitor volume down a bit to watch the www.youtube.com/yogajeans video.)

Brand new are plus-size skinny Yoga Jeans in sizes 14 to 24 (about $130), which just hit select Addition-Elle stores across Canada. “When they heard about the brand, Addition-Elle approached us to create a boot-cut for their customer; it’s been in stores about a year,” says Wazana. “The skinny fit answers the demand for jeans that plus women can tuck into their boots.”

The size diversity also answers a creative need for the designer, who says he likes approaching his work from new angles. “Women are sick of feeling like they have to be perfect to be beautiful,” Wazana adds.  “I’ve always thought the plus market has been overlooked by many designers.”

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