Julien Goldstein Kryvichi, Belarus. November 2010. A kolkhoz (collective farm) 100 km north of Minsk. 3 200 hectares, 130 employees. School of the city built in 1958 (restored in 1975).

This May 15, Metro readers worldwide are invited to take part for one day in “the largest collaborative photography project in history.”

Aday.org asks pro and amateur photographers on one day only this May to take their cameras and capture moments in their daily life.

Organizers literally want to get a snapshot of the world we now live in.

“We are encouraging millions to photograph their daily life that will give millions of perspectives for immediate exploration and historic reflection,” Ayperi Karabuda Ecer, Editor in Chief of Aday.org, told Metro.

This global event, lauded by luminaries such as Nobel Peace Prize laureate Desmond Tutu and pop artist Robyn, will see millions of images generated for what organizers hope will give a “planetary message for the future.”

“This will be an unprecedented mixture of capturing the energy of one single day with preserving it for generations to come,” says Ecer, who is Vice President of Pictures at Reuters and is on sabbatical leave for the Aday.org project.

Hundreds of Aday.org photo experts, including some 30 World Press Photo winners, now plan what they’ll capture on the day.

Photographers must take their images on May 15 and will have one week to upload onto the Aday.org website. The photographs will then be posted on a online database, “an ‘exploration center’ to view what the world has shot,” Ecer says.

“A Day in the World”, a book with a thousand images from the project, will be published in November. An exhibition will be
screened on outdoor screens in city centers worldwide.

“What’s interesting for Metro readers is what their photographic viewpoint of their cities will be and how it’ll compare in the future,” Ecer adds.

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